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  1. #1

    Your Investment Outlook on a Scale of 1 t...

    Dear Morningstar.com Readers,
    There's plenty to feel worried about these days, what with Europe's woes and concerns about slowing global growth. At the same time, recent market declines could provide buying opportunities for bargain-hunters.
    In an effort to do an informal check of investor sentiment, I'd like to hear how you'd rate your own attitude toward stocks right now--with 1 being deeply bearish and 10 being ultra-bullish. I'd also like to hear what factors are driving your views.
    Please weigh in by posting in the thread below. I'll summarize your responses in an article that will run on the site this coming Sunday, June 10.
    As always, I look forward to hearing from you!
    Christine Benz
    Director of Personal Finance

  2. #2
    - i enjoy whats going on - the market seems bearish now........if you're a long term investor this bearish time is simply normal, a blip on the radar screen....it looks like a time to sit on the side, watch and wait for another uptrend like what we had recently from dec/jan to march/april 2012 before getting too involved -- i guess it depends on your time horizon and style of investing you do, but overall there is no better place to be for investing...being patient, i look foward to the return of a bull run....

  3. #3
    The market is pretty much where it was 20 years ago and I'm not gonna live forever so I'm burnt out on stocks and mutual funds. I'm not gonna sell but just hang onto what I've got and hope to break even someday. I guess my attitude would be 1 on a scale of 1 to 10.

  4. #4
    I find investing increasingly tedious and frustrating (if this were the '90s, however, I'd probably use words like 'thrilling' and 'rewarding'). I have no expectations: politicians the world over are mired in their narrow little worlds, obviously catering to their most extreme adherents and unable to achieve anything. (We've certainly had polarizing leaders in the past--think Richard Nixon--but compromise was not the dirty word it seems to be now.) Brinksmanship is the order of the day. The macro view is ominous. And yet people and businesses are resilient. There will be innovations and better ways to do things, some of which will be lucrative. Will Apple reinvent the TV? Will some pharmaceutical company discover an important cure? At the end of the day I guess I'm a 5.

  5. #5
    Like last summer, political contestation in the U.S. has pushed sound fiscal and financial reform off into the future.
    I'm 3-ish and defensive toward U.S. equities until after election day (November 6). In international markets, what's to like about the European situation or China -- or Brazil for that matter? I only hope for some recovery or stabilization in all of those places and the U.S. so that I can rebalance my global investments in the coming months.
    Added: After the election, I'm more bullish on equities but not freakishly so. Make me a 6. I'm a couple of years from retirement and thinking about capital (value) preservation more than I did a few years ago. But I've lost confidence in the self-regulation and governmental oversight of our financial industry and equities markets. I'm not going to stick my neck out and substantially expand my equities holdings.


 

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